Our Amazing Earth

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funkshuttles created the topic: Our Amazing Earth

So I'm taking a basic geology lecture and lab at the local community college. It's the last class (besides statistics) that I need to finish up my 4-year degree requirements. Geology really is a fascinating subject and learning how the Earth's geological functions work is amazing. I see examples of what I've learned EVERY day when I go outside; from seeing granite gravel in peoples' yards; to the alluvial fans coming out of the desert mountains. To know that all of the sand on a beach is the result of granite's decomposition into its base mineral components as a result of weathering... knowledge truly is power :)

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fireme replied the topic: Our Amazing Earth

I'm a fan of wind (Excuse the play on words) and weather. The electrical currents that surround us, How a storm is formed. Things like that. Any links relevant to what they are teaching you?

You're right though, the earth and its atmosphere make for a very interesting piece of spinning rock.

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funkshuttles replied the topic: Our Amazing Earth

I'll try to dig up some links to some of the material that's not password-protected. But I can say that wind is an essential factor in the decomposition of rocks. Granite is an intrusive igneous rock and forms from magma. It's felsic which means it forms at lower temperatures than the more mafic rocks. At the temperatures that granite forms, it's mainly composed of feldspar, biotite mica and quartz. Away from the heat and pressure which cause the magma to crystallize as it slowly cools (intrusive), granite is not stable. It is especially effected by wind and water. The feldspar in granite decomposes into clay while the quartz turns into... sand. Of course water transports the quartz downstream; as it travels it gets worn away by friction with other rocks. Eventually, it becomes a grain of sand.

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funkshuttles replied the topic: Our Amazing Earth

Hi Fireme,

Here's a good place to start, if you want a crash course on some of the systems at work on our planet: Link . It seems to cover a lot of the basics that I learned but also goes into greater detail for some of it.

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Mushroom replied the topic: Our Amazing Earth

The Earth is really alive and goes on her own agenda. Everything she produces is so unique that there will always be new things to discover. I used to be interested in learning about the stones and rocks, but I fell behind.

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